Welcome to Olivia Cooke Central, your newest fansite dedicated to Olivia Cooke. We provide you with all the latest news, photos, medias, and much more on Olivia. You may recognize Olivia from the television series Bates Motel or from the films The Quiet Ones, The Signal, Ouija, Me And Earl And the Dying Girl. Check out the site and please come back soon!
December 13, 2015 • 0 Comments

Best Supporting Actor, Female
Alicia Vikander, THE DANISH GIRL
Jennifer Jason Leigh, THE HATEFUL EIGHT
Helen Mirren, TRUMBO
Kristen Stewart, CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA
Olivia Cooke, ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL

Congrats Olivia for your nomination!

December 13, 2015 • 0 Comments

VMAGAZINE.COM – Twenty-year-old Olivia Cooke has just been cast in Steven Spielberg’s next film, Ready Player One, despite “self-sabotaging” her audition. “He’s really lovely,” the Mancunian gushes, clearly relieved. Filming won’t start for quite some time, but the announcement is placed prominently on her IMDb page, which the very private Cooke finds odd. She “can’t be bothered” with Twitter or Instagram, she says. “The thing with social media these days is you can’t really say what you want. It’s always going to be judged or backfire. I don’t want to be a spokeswoman unless I’ve really got something worthwhile and important to say. Otherwise, it’s just pictures of, I don’t know, fucking lakes and beaches. It’s like a mum showing pictures of her child.”

Technically, and sort of ironically, her breakout role was a nonspeaking part. In a video, filmed to be played behind a One Direction tour, Cooke can be seen gallivanting in a field with the boy band. “That was just half a day of my life when I was 17,” she sighs. “It was 250 quid. They’d only just come out of The X-Factor so they weren’t even known at all. It’s a bit embarrassing that that was, like, the start of my career.”

Next came “screaming at nothing, CGI-ed ghosts” and suffering on-screen illnesses in an array of American and British accents (but never her own rounded northern intonation). She gasps and cries in The Quiet Ones, Blackout, The Signal, Ouija, the forthcoming Limehouse Golem, and in an ongoing role in the TV prequel to the horror film of all horror films, Bates Motel. Here, Cooke’s character is not only dangerously close to the young Norman Bates, slowly discovering his psychotic tendencies, but she often needs a respirator for shortness of breath due to cystic fibrosis.

Arguably, Cooke’s real breakout wasn’t until this year, when she played Rachel, a teen with leukemia, in Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, based on the popular Jesse Andrews novel. The screenplay, also written by Andrews, intentionally waffles between sentimentality and distraction through its referencing of classic independent film. The clever format is telling of its characters’ hyper-researched generation and also of the way anyone, young or old, handles tragic loss. Devoted to the role, Cooke opted to shave her head halfway through filming instead of wearing a skullcap for when her character undergoes chemotherapy. (The studio promised to pay for the $10,000 wig she’d need for continuity in Bates Motel, Cooke confides.) Authenticity has no price. “[Rachel]’s a totally real-life character,” says Cooke. “You don’t want her to just be another Manic Pixie Dream Girl that just comes in and changes this guy’s life and then edges away slowly, saying all these really profound things in her last moments of life. She’s human, completely human.”

For her starring role in the forthcoming Katie Says Goodbye, the freedom that came from what she calls “bare-bones drama” (meaning no horror or illness to muddy a character’s emotional distress) completely changed Cooke’s way of thinking. Katie, a small-town Arizona diner waitress, prostitutes herself after hours.

“She wouldn’t call herself a prostitute, though,” Cooke corrects. “Sex isn’t a taboo subject for her. She sees this as a simple transaction—she makes these guys happy and she gets paid for it. I don’t want to go on the bandwagon of how women are perceived in films, but it was so freeing for me to be liberated of any inhibitions, any embarrassment.”

Without having seen a cut of the film, she’s ready to defend its depiction of sexuality, if only for the sake of variety. “You never really see a woman being pleasured in film,” she says. “You see a woman getting raped or beaten, or seen as the jailbait, or she’s the old hag, but you’ll never see a woman in control of all of her sex. It’s a weird thing in America when you’ll see someone’s head being blown off more than you’ll see someone having a loving, intimate sex scene—which actually happens all the time. Rarely does someone’s head get blown off.”

November 26, 2015 • 0 Comments

Hi! 879 screencaptures from the movie Me And Earl and the Dying Girl have been added to the gallery. Enjoy


High schooler Greg, who spends most of his time making parodies of classic movies with his co-worker Earl, finds his outlook forever altered after befriending a classmate who has just been diagnosed with cancer.

Movie directed by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon
Cast Thomas Mann, RJ Cyler, Olivia Cooke, Nick Offerman, Jon Bernthal, Connie Britton, Molly Shannon, Katherine Hughes…

October 15, 2015 • 0 Comments

INTOTHEGLOSS “I just got off of this big press tour for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, which was insane. It was a plane journey every single day and it just knackered me because we were going from city to city in America—we’d be in Chicago for 20 hours and then we’d be rushed off to go to Austin. It was just this weird cycle where you’d wake up and not know what city you were in. Hotel to hotel to radio station. It was hard, but it was exciting—after that tour is done, we’re off to do it in Europe.

When they were auditioning actresses for the movie, it was never said that the actress would have to shave her head—it was like ‘Oh no, you know, wear a bald cap, it’ll be fine.’ But then two weeks before filming, going into production, I sent the director a really panicked email saying bald caps look awful even if you use the best makeup artist and hairstylist in the world. I’ve got so much hair and it’s going to look so bulbous…it’s going to take everyone out of the movie and I don’t want anything that I’m doing to tamper with the honesty of the script. So we shaved my head, and it was the best thing I ever did for the role and for the performance. There’s a scene in the movie when I tell the main character that I just feel so ugly and repulsive and we had just shaved my head the night before—it felt very real. Rubbing your head for the first time and feeling a bald scalp is just…I’ve never experienced anything like it. I didn’t realize how much I needed my hair in order to make myself feel beautiful—it should have just come from me. Also, I think my people skills developed a lot because of the shave. When a woman with a buzz cut comes up to you, you have to start a conversation with her. It was kind of fun breaking that barrier with people.

When I got here for the tour, my eczema was just raging. Now it’s not too bad but I really had to focus on what products I was using. I only wash my face with a blemish controlling face wash and a toner and a moisturizer at night. Then in the morning I just rinse my face in the shower and leave it because I think, for me, less is more. But this morning—because I knew I was going to get pictures taken—I put on this Laura Mercier Caviar Stick that I just smudged on my eyes with a brush and made it into more of a flick. Then I have black Dior mascara on my top lashes and brown eyeliner. I don’t really like to wear foundation, so I just dot concealer on my spots and around my eyes and put a bit of bronzer on for some shimmer. And Glossier Balm Dotcom is really good. I’m replacing my Lucas Pawpaw Ointment with it.

I love Instagram—particularly the fact that I can follow fashion houses and beauty brands and photographers and tattoo artists and also my friends at the same time. Keep it all so close. I have a private Instagram that’s just for me and my friends. I don’t have anything else. I don’t have Facebook, not even a private Facebook or a private Twitter. For me, social media is for stalking my friends and seeing what they’re up to. It’s the quickest way to see if they’re around. I never entered this profession to be a celebrity or to be a spokeswoman or to have my opinion heard. If I’ve got something to say, then I’ll say it, but I don’t think it needs to resonate with millions of people. Also, if I’m not getting work because I don’t have two million followers on Twitter then fuck it. I don’t want to be doing that sort of stuff anyway.”

—as told to ITG

September 12, 2015 • 0 Comments

YOU – The talented 21-year-old actress from Oldham is a tragi-comic tour de force in the highly acclaimed new comedy drama Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Who is she? Still only 21, this talented young actress from Oldham has quietly been making a name for herself. After impressing as a traumatised girl alongside Sam Claflin in last year’s horror flick The Quiet Ones, she now plays the female lead in highly acclaimed new comedy drama Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. TV fans will also recognise her from dark drama series Bates Motel, with Freddie Highmore.

Big break Me and Earl was a sensation at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, scooping both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award. Olivia plays Rachel, an American teenager with leukaemia who forms an unlikely friendship with two boys from her school. The film is quirky, funny and moving – think a platonic The Fault in our Stars meets (500) Days of Summer.

The groundwork Olivia researched her role rigorously, meeting with a teenage cancer patient and doctors. ‘I didn’t ever want Rachel to be seen as a victim or a tragic character – I wanted her to be this beacon of strength and heart,’ she says. ‘But at the same time I did want her illness to be realistic.’ Shaving her head, she says, ‘was the best thing I did to get into the character. I thought it would be really disrespectful, because the movie’s so honest, if you saw me wearing this big, bulky bald cap.’

Fast fact Aged 17, she got a piggyback from Harry Styles in a One Direction tour video, making her the envy of teenage girls everywhere – except perhaps her own mates: ‘None of them likes their music, so I think it was more embarrassing than it was cool…’

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is in cinemas now

September 05, 2015 • 0 Comments