Welcome to Olivia Cooke Central, your newest fansite dedicated to Olivia Cooke. We provide you with all the latest news, photos, medias, and much more on Olivia. You may recognize Olivia from the television series Bates Motel or from the films The Quiet Ones, The Signal, Ouija, Me And Earl And the Dying Girl. Check out the site and please come back soon!
May 19, 2017 • 0 Comments

I have added 1 poster + 9 new stills from the movie The Limehouse Golem.

GALLERY LINKS
Films > The Limehouse Golem > Posters
Films > The Limehouse Golem > Stills

May 08, 2017 • 0 Comments

▶ In Cinemas September 1 (UK)
▶ Starring: Bill Nighy, Douglas Booth, Olivia Cooke
▶ Directed by Juan Carlos Medina

Synopsis: Set on the unforgiving, squalid streets of Victorian London in 1880, our tale begins in the baroque, grandiose music hall where the capital’s most renowned performer Dan Leno (Douglas Booth) takes to the stage. The whimsical thespian performs a monologue, informing his dedicated audience of the ghastly fate of a young woman who had once adorned this very stage, his dear friend Elizabeth Cree (Olivia Cooke); for the beguiling songstress is facing up to her forthcoming death by hanging, having been accused of murdering her husband John Cree (Sam Reid). Lizzie’s death seems inevitable, until Detective Inspector John Kildare (Bill Nighy) is assigned to the case of the Limehouse Golem – a nefarious, calculating serial killer, murdering innocent, unconnected victims, leaving behind barely identifiable corpses – and his distinctive signature in blood. All is not what it seems and everyone is a suspect and everyone has a secret.

September 13, 2016 • 0 Comments

I have added 11 new portraits from the Toronto International Film Festival to the gallery. Olivia looks stunning!

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Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > Deadline #001
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > Deadline #002
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > Los Angeles Times #001
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > Los Angeles Times #002
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > The Hollywood Reporter
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > People
Portraits > 2016 > Toronto International Film Festival > Instyle

September 12, 2016 • 0 Comments

It’s not glamorous. [Performers of the past] are in such dire conditions. They’re not acclaimed performers like you see now, they are clowns,” said actress Olivia Cooke of playing a performer in pthe upcoming horror-thriller ‘The Limehouse Golem.’ She is joined by co-stars Bill Nighy and Douglas Booth.

September 11, 2016 • 0 Comments

Hi! Olivia attended the premiere of The Limehouse Golem at the Toronto International Film Festival yesterday with her co-stars Douglas Booth and Bill Nighy. I have added 6 HQ photos to the gallery

September 09, 2016 • 0 Comments

DEADLINEThe Limehouse Golem, from Stephen Woolley and Elizabeth Karlsen’s Number 9 Films, has its world premiere on Saturday as a Special Presentation in Toronto. The gothic murder mystery is written by Jane Goldman based on Peter Ackroyd’s 1994 novel Dan Leno And The Limeshouse Golem.

It’s set in an atmospheric 1880 London when a series of murders has shaken the community to the point where people believe that only a legendary creature from dark times — the mythical Golem — must be responsible. Woolley has said the film comes with a twist “more sensational” than The Crying Game. Juan Carlos Medina (Painless) directs. Check out an exclusive clip above that sets the scene inside one of the boisterous music halls of the time.

The crime thriller uses London’s seedy Limehouse district as its backdrop. Police inspector John Kildare (Bill Nighy) is brought in to solve the mystery and calm the panicked population. He is talked through the past of Elizabeth Cree (Olivia Cooke), a music hall performer accused of poisoning her husband, as he seeks clues that might help his investigation and is soon hot on the trail of the deranged killer. The story incorporates fictionalized versions of historical figures while an essence of Jack the Ripper looms. Eddie Marsan also stars.

The period piece has been described as being in the style of David Fincher’s Seven and James Watkins’ The Woman In Black. It was adapted by the versatile and in-demand Goldman who also penned Woman In Black. Her other credits include the X-Men and Kingsman franchises and Tim Burton’s upcoming Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children. Toronto is her first film festival with one of her pictures.

Goldman says she first discovered Ackroyd’s novel before she was a screenwriter “and thought it would make a movie I would love to see. I looked it up and saw Stephen was attached and thought, ‘Oh, good, someone is making it’.” Fast-forward several years and during a stint on an awards jury with Woolley, she asked what had happened to the project. An earlier option had lapsed, but had just become available again and Woolley called her a few days later to say, “I got you the rights.”

She was drawn to the material because there is “a wonderful twist… I’m very, very, very happy to be tricked and caught off guard. I also love the world that it’s set in: Victorian period vaudeville theater.” And, she adds, “all English people have a fascination with Jack the Ripper. I don’t know why because it’s so dreadful, but such a strange endearing part of our culture. Morbid fascination sums it up.”

The cast was set back in April 2015 with Alan Rickman due to star as Kildare. When he became ill, he reluctantly pulled out and subsequently passed away in January this year. His mark, however, remains on the part of the intrepid Kildare. Goldman tells me she had incorporated some changes which came from Rickman’s own notes and thoughts on the character. “It’s lovely to feel his spirit in there.”

Lionsgate quickly acquired UK rights and Hanway is selling The Limehouse Golem internationally with WME on domestic. Goldman says, “I know how much I adored the book and have given it to friends. When I say I just adapted it, people are very excited. I hope the film finds its audience and captivates in the same way as the book.”