Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 18, 2021

A day with actor Olivia Cooke from Oscar nominated “Sound of Metal”, wandering in her very own cinema.
An absurd daydream directed by Scandebergs for Soho House April Lead Feature, 2021.

We meet the Sound Of Metal actor at Electric Cinema in Notting Hill ahead of the Oscars. She gives us the lowdown on solo cinema trips, gaming, and maintaining a healthy sense of the absurd

Like many of us, Olivia Cooke is looking forward to the end of lockdown. Unlike many of us, she had something of a practice run for this tumultuous last year while filming Little Fish, a movie about an airborne pandemic that causes people to lose their memories. ‘It felt so different making it and so far from reality that [at first] I didn’t even put two and two together,’ she says when asked about its uncanny prescience. Next, she appeared in the multi-award-nominated Sound Of Metal playing Lou, the girlfriend of a heavy metal drummer (Riz Ahmed) who loses his hearing. She’s also set to begin filming Game Of Thrones’ prequel House Of The Dragon.

Given such a busy schedule, is she still anticipating some fun this summer? Absolutely. ‘I’m never going to say no to anything again,’ she says forcefully.

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 04, 2021

Olivia Cooke on the Oscar-nominated Sound of Metal and the pressures of being a woman on set
The Oldham-born actress is best known for playing Becky Sharp in Vanity Fair. Now Olivia Cooke, 27, is starring in an Oscar hopeful and preparing for a Game of Thrones spin-off.

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 01, 2021

Olivia Cooke Slips Into Dark Lipstick for a Complicated Spring
After finding her noise-rock edge for the Oscar-nominated Sound of Metal, the British actor channels a new mood.

It was only a couple of years ago that Olivia Cooke learned how to really scream: a primal, guttural roar set loose from the body, the kind of sound that turns the soul inside out. For her recent role as the withdrawn, hard-driven front woman Lou in Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal, she had six weeks to learn how to play the guitar, operate a loop pedal, and perform the searing noise-rock track that cements the acoustic texture of the film’s opening. On top of all that, she had to tear open a sonic aperture in her petite frame through which she could channel Lou’s raw, dynamic power, the character’s hidden strength.

“I think we all in the shower imagine that we’re performing to 3,000 people, rocking out with a guitar onstage. But the reality of doing that is so much more traumatic,” Cooke tells me over Zoom, leaning in so that her dark, expressive eyes loom large in the center of the screen. She’s at home in London filming a new series, and all around her the city is in the midst of another coronavirus lockdown. With her wild auburn waves and daring mouth, 27-year-old Cooke resembles nothing so much as the heroine of a gothic novel, a girl about to wheel around and face the monster head-on. So it’s surprising to hear her divulge rock star performance anxieties: “sleepless nights, dreams about it all going wrong.” Shrugging slyly, as if literally shaking off the seriousness of what she’s just said, she adds, “I mean, when’s the last time you screamed out of something other than fear?”

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   March 27, 2021

2 scans from ELLE UK April 2021 have been added to the gallery

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   March 24, 2021

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTERThe SFFILM’s hybrid event will show 103 films online and at physical drive-in screenings.

The San Francisco Film Festival will kick off its 2021 edition with a world premiere of director Chase Palmer’s Naked Singularity, which stars John Boyega, Olivia Cooke, Bill Skarsgard and Ed Skrein.

On April 9, the film that stars Boyega as an impassioned public defender who stumbles into a drug heist while his reality collapses all around him will stream online and at a drive-in theater. And SFFILM’s hybrid edition this year will close on April 18 with an online and drive-in screening of Street Gang: How We Got to Sesame Street, a documentary that chronicles the origins of the legendary childrens’ TV show Sesame Street and which bowed at Sundance.

San Francisco’s Centerpiece film this year will be Bo McGuire’s Socks on Fire, with a North American premiere for the doc by director McGuire that explores old family wounds between a homophobic aunt and a drag queen uncle. The April 10 drive-in screening will include a drag show featuring local performers and emceed by director McGuire.

The festival also booked a world premiere for Teppo Airaksinen’s Supercool comedy and Tasha Van Zandt’s After Antarctica, which recalls an expedition across the frigid continent. And the SFFILM’s 64th edition has North American bows for Lee Ran-hee’s A Leave; Michal Wnuk’s Overclockers aviation drama; Chloe Mazlo’s Skies of Lebanon, a romancer set against that country’s civil war; The Whaler Boy, by director Phillipp Yuryev; and Captains of Zaatari, a documentary by Egyptian director Ali El-Arabi.

The festival’s pandemic-era lineup includes 42 feature films and 56 short films from 41 countries. In all, 57 percent of the films were directed by female filmmakers and 57 percent were helmed by BIPOC filmmakers.

The San Francisco Film Festival is set to run April 9-18.