Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 01, 2021

Olivia Cooke Slips Into Dark Lipstick for a Complicated Spring
After finding her noise-rock edge for the Oscar-nominated Sound of Metal, the British actor channels a new mood.

It was only a couple of years ago that Olivia Cooke learned how to really scream: a primal, guttural roar set loose from the body, the kind of sound that turns the soul inside out. For her recent role as the withdrawn, hard-driven front woman Lou in Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal, she had six weeks to learn how to play the guitar, operate a loop pedal, and perform the searing noise-rock track that cements the acoustic texture of the film’s opening. On top of all that, she had to tear open a sonic aperture in her petite frame through which she could channel Lou’s raw, dynamic power, the character’s hidden strength.

“I think we all in the shower imagine that we’re performing to 3,000 people, rocking out with a guitar onstage. But the reality of doing that is so much more traumatic,” Cooke tells me over Zoom, leaning in so that her dark, expressive eyes loom large in the center of the screen. She’s at home in London filming a new series, and all around her the city is in the midst of another coronavirus lockdown. With her wild auburn waves and daring mouth, 27-year-old Cooke resembles nothing so much as the heroine of a gothic novel, a girl about to wheel around and face the monster head-on. So it’s surprising to hear her divulge rock star performance anxieties: “sleepless nights, dreams about it all going wrong.” Shrugging slyly, as if literally shaking off the seriousness of what she’s just said, she adds, “I mean, when’s the last time you screamed out of something other than fear?”

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   February 07, 2021

Executive producer-lead actress Olivia Cooke (soon to be seen in the highly anticipated GAME OF THRONES prequel series) and acclaimed actor Jack O’Connell chat with Brief Take’s Charles Trapunski about their new film LITTLE FISH, how they feel in America versus the UK, what they’ve been watching lately, and what they’ve really missed during the COVID time.

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   February 02, 2021

The actress talks about her busy year with films like “Sound of Metal,” “Little Fish” and the highly anticipated “GOT” series.

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   November 24, 2020

Opening in theaters and on demand February 5

Director: Chad Hartigan
Starring: Olivia Cooke, Jack O’Connell, Soko

As a memory loss virus runs rampant, one couple fights to hold their relationship together before the disease can erase all memory of their love in this sweeping sci-fi romance.

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   September 24, 2020

VARIETYIFC Films has nabbed Chad Hartigan’s “Little Fish,” a love story set in a post-pandemic world that will have an eerie resonance when viewed in light of the coronavirus crisis.

The deal is for North American rights. IFC, which has remained active during COVID-19, releasing films such as “The Nest” and “The Trip to Greece,” will debut the picture on Feb. 5, 2021. “Little Fish” stars Olivia Cooke (“Ready Player One”), Jack O’Connell (“Unbroken”), Raúl Castillo (HBO’s “Looking”), and French singer-songwriter Soko. “Little Fish” boasts a screenplay by Mattson Tomlin based on a short story by Aja Gabel.

According to the official log line, “Little Fish” unfolds in a world where a pandemic has broken out. The disease causes its victims to lose their memories. Newlyweds Emma (Cooke) and Jude (O’Connell) have to grapple with this painful new reality. After Jude contracts the disease, the young couple struggles to hold onto the memory of their romance.

“Chad Hartigan’s prescient and deeply felt love story blew us away on every level,” said Arianna Bocco, EVP of acquisitions and productions at IFC Films. “The stellar performances and gorgeous cinematography complement Chad’s unique and beautiful vision. This is the love story for this moment – bring tissues.”

Hartigan is best known for directing “This is Martin Bonner,” which won Best of NEXT Audience Award as well as the John Cassavetes Award at the Film independent Spirit Awards. He also directed “Morris From America,” which won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award. “Little Fish” was expected to debut at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. However, the annual film gathering was upended due to the coronavirus outbreak.

In a statement, Hartigan said he was happy to land at an indie distributor like IFC, citing the company’s penchant for backing unconventional films.

“’From ‘Me and You and Everyone We Know’ to ‘Hunger,’ IFC has released countless films that have inspired and shaped me over the years and as the challenges of 2020 have proven again, they remain one of the most adept and adaptable distribution companies in the business,” he said. “I can think of no better partner to bring this pandemic love story to audiences.”

The deal for the film was negotiated by Bocco for IFC with CAA Media Finance representing the filmmakers. Sony Pictures’ Stage 6 Films has rights to the film outside of the U.S.