Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 18, 2021

A day with actor Olivia Cooke from Oscar nominated “Sound of Metal”, wandering in her very own cinema.
An absurd daydream directed by Scandebergs for Soho House April Lead Feature, 2021.

We meet the Sound Of Metal actor at Electric Cinema in Notting Hill ahead of the Oscars. She gives us the lowdown on solo cinema trips, gaming, and maintaining a healthy sense of the absurd

Like many of us, Olivia Cooke is looking forward to the end of lockdown. Unlike many of us, she had something of a practice run for this tumultuous last year while filming Little Fish, a movie about an airborne pandemic that causes people to lose their memories. ‘It felt so different making it and so far from reality that [at first] I didn’t even put two and two together,’ she says when asked about its uncanny prescience. Next, she appeared in the multi-award-nominated Sound Of Metal playing Lou, the girlfriend of a heavy metal drummer (Riz Ahmed) who loses his hearing. She’s also set to begin filming Game Of Thrones’ prequel House Of The Dragon.

Given such a busy schedule, is she still anticipating some fun this summer? Absolutely. ‘I’m never going to say no to anything again,’ she says forcefully.

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   April 01, 2021

Olivia Cooke Slips Into Dark Lipstick for a Complicated Spring
After finding her noise-rock edge for the Oscar-nominated Sound of Metal, the British actor channels a new mood.

It was only a couple of years ago that Olivia Cooke learned how to really scream: a primal, guttural roar set loose from the body, the kind of sound that turns the soul inside out. For her recent role as the withdrawn, hard-driven front woman Lou in Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal, she had six weeks to learn how to play the guitar, operate a loop pedal, and perform the searing noise-rock track that cements the acoustic texture of the film’s opening. On top of all that, she had to tear open a sonic aperture in her petite frame through which she could channel Lou’s raw, dynamic power, the character’s hidden strength.

“I think we all in the shower imagine that we’re performing to 3,000 people, rocking out with a guitar onstage. But the reality of doing that is so much more traumatic,” Cooke tells me over Zoom, leaning in so that her dark, expressive eyes loom large in the center of the screen. She’s at home in London filming a new series, and all around her the city is in the midst of another coronavirus lockdown. With her wild auburn waves and daring mouth, 27-year-old Cooke resembles nothing so much as the heroine of a gothic novel, a girl about to wheel around and face the monster head-on. So it’s surprising to hear her divulge rock star performance anxieties: “sleepless nights, dreams about it all going wrong.” Shrugging slyly, as if literally shaking off the seriousness of what she’s just said, she adds, “I mean, when’s the last time you screamed out of something other than fear?”

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   March 10, 2021

Olivia Cooke at the #MiuMiuFW21 fashion show by #MiucciaPrada remotely from London.

Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   March 04, 2021

BYRDIE MAGAZINEZoom Date: Olivia Cooke On Her Skincare Routine and Road Trip Dreams
Plus, she talks about filming her latest projects, Little Fish and Pixie.

Olivia Cooke is something of a chameleon. This shouldn’t come as a surprise; after all, the 27-year-old actress has collected accolades for performances as Emma Decody on Bates Motel, Becky Sharpe in Amazon’s 2018 Vanity Fair miniseries, and Ready Player One’s mysterious love interest Art3mis. Still, it isn’t until halfway through our conversation that I realize Cooke also plays the lead in one of my favorite movies—2017’s Thoroughbred. In the film, she co-starred alongside the late Anton Yelchin and a pre-Queen’s Gambit Anya Taylor-Joy.

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Olivia Cooke Central STAFF   February 12, 2021

INTERVIEW MAGAZINE – When Olivia Cooke began developing Little Fish with the screenwriter Mattson Tomlin, their goal was to take a farfetched premise and ground it in something more recognizable. Instead, the story’s sci-fi hook—a pandemic featuring an Alzheimer’s-like illness that causes rapid memory loss—gave the movie an accidental timeliness that the 27-year-old actor, who also serves as an executive producer, is still trying to wrap her head around. Cooke plays one half of a married couple struggling to cope as her husband (Jack O’Connell) slips away at the hands of the disease. For Cooke, who made her name in Sundance hits like Me Earl and the Dying Girl and Thoroughbreds, the movie comes on the heels of her visceral performance in the eerily similar Sound of Metal, where she plays the lead singer of the hard rock group Backgammon, whose drummer (Riz Ahmed), who she is also romantically involved with, begins to lose his hearing. Up next, the Manchester native will take a hard pivot out of indie fare as she prepares to film her role as Alicent Hightower in the enormously anticipated Game of Thrones prequel House of Dragons. But for now, she’s just hanging out in her London flat, which is where she connected with her friend, the actor Naomi Scott, with whom she is starting a podcast, to discuss, among other things, the highs and lows of being an actor.

NAOMI SCOTT: Olivia Cooke, this is fun. Do people call you Liv, Livvy, what’s the deal there?

OLIVIA COOKE: Livie when I was a kid. My first MSN name was Livieyaxx. I was so naughty. And now people just call me Liv.

SCOTT: I feel like a lot of people don’t know that you’re from Manchester, because you’re always doing an American accent. Do people come up to you and think you’re American?

COOKE: In America. I never get recognized anyway, but if I do it’s usually by people who have done a bit of research. But Brits don’t really tend to come up to you.

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